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  2. The state wants to roll back protections on millions of acres of forest land owned by U.S. taxpayers. View the full article
  3. Nor Serocki

    Dune Training 5/23

    Hi All, Shaun Howard wanted me to pass along the information on a Dunes training here in Berrien County this Thursday, 5/23. Please see the link for details! Invite to Chickaming dune workshop
  4. Shelby Bauer

    Bull Thistle Management

    Thank you Katie!
  5. Worms are wriggling into Earth’s northernmost forests, creating major unknowns for climate-change models. View the full article
  6. Katie Grzesiak

    Bull Thistle Management

    Manual removal is most effective before it flowers. Asparagus knives (something like this) or other weed forks are really great for getting out the taproot. You can use herbicides too, but get excited about surfactant because it takes a fair amount to penetrate the crazy trichomes/prickles.
  7. Earlier
  8. Does anyone have experience or advice in managing/treating for bull thistle that they could share?
  9. A few years ago NWMISN shopped around for herbicide injectors, particularly for Japanese Knotweed. The best price we found was actually a model from the UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/jk-injector-japanese-knotweed/dp/B00WTC7MDK It cost ~$100 USD. They are well built and come with a variety of needle types and spare parts. No issues to report thus far so it may be an option to explore. Hope that helps!
  10. I am in the same process and would love to hear some feedback on this. I planned to get a few extra needles, but there are a few types and was curious on the best ones to get/most useful ones.
  11. I am currently looking at different herbicide injector devices to best treat Japanese Knotweed. Does anyone have any recommendations for a supplier and what types of needles to buy? Any information would be greatly appreciated.
  12. NewsBot

    Life as We Know It

    Plant and animal species are disappearing faster than at any time in recorded history. We know who is to blame. View the full article
  13. Unique opportunity to work as a student assistant with the Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy. Students will be traveling around the state addressing watch list aquatic plants and working close with CISMAs to assist with mapping and response activities. This is a great summer employment opportunity for any student https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/michigan/jobs/2439293/student-assistant-aquatic-invasive-species-2-vacancies?fbclid=IwAR3TeV5c6YzY5eDpSZIvkY1SvZojaRzY8qqJBzVhtUJ_aZKH8WWVKlulgDA
  14. The authors of a sweeping United Nations report on species in danger of extinction faced the same question I often do in reporting: Why should anyone care about the loss of nature? View the full article
  15. The Mid-Michigan CISMA is hosting free workshops in each of its counties in May. Attached is a press release with more details of each workshop. Registration is available on the Mid-Michigan CISMA webpage or through the CISMA's Facebook events page at www.facebook.com/mmcisma. May 2019- Invasive Species Landowner Workshops.pdf
  16. McKenzi Bergmoser

    Lake St. Clair CISMA Events

  17. McKenzi Bergmoser

    Lake St. Clair CISMA / MISIN Mapping Workshop

    MISIN Workshop_2019.pdf
  18. Katie Grzesiak

    Wild Parsnip Management

    I have used glyphosate in the past, but timing is important--it's most effective in early season, before the 2nd year plants bolt. It's easy to target the flowering adults, but that's not very effective--2nd years I've just cut the seed heads to prevent spread.
  19. A dire United Nations report, based on thousands of scientific studies, paints an urgent picture of biodiversity loss and finds that climate change is amplifying the danger to humanity. View the full article
  20. A dire United Nations report, based on thousands of scientific studies, paints an urgent picture of biodiversity loss and finds that climate change is amplifying the danger to humanity. View the full article
  21. I'm wondering what others do for managing wild parsnip. I have some large sites where hand pulling would not be a very effective option. We have used a glyphosate mix in the past but didn't get very good results. I have read MNFI/DNR's BMP and their herbicide suggestion is glyphosate. Does anyone else do anything different?
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  23. Elise Desjarlais

    Treatment Notification Posting

    We have a small, laminated signs that we post during the treatments. I find its easiest (and the signs usually last) to leave them until we come back for our treatment monitoring plots. That way, we're making the drive anyway to analyze our treatment efficacy, and we can grab the sign at that point. Two birds, one car ride!
  24. Most of the signs that we've posted have been for partner municipalities for Japanese Knotweed. We too laminate sheets and staple them to stakes, but in this case we leave them for a while, both to explain why the municipality is allowing this "unsightly" plant get out of control, and to why it's being sprayed later. These don't contain legal treatment information either, but have contact information changed for each area to include the local DPW director/etc for each municipality in addition to the CISMA. Because these are being left up for longer, we put a little bit more effort into the design, both to use them as a warning and an educational opportunity. Knotweed Treatment in Process.pdf
  25. Feral felines are driving the country’s native species to extinction. Now a massive culling is underway to preserve what’s left of the wild. View the full article
  26. Feral felines are driving the country’s native species to extinction. Now a massive culling is underway to preserve what’s left of the wild. View the full article
  27. Katie Grzesiak

    Treatment Notification Posting

    That's what we do too, except we don't even laminate. They don't look great, but we often don't drive around to get them--when they're on private lands, we often request that the landowner grab them after a week or so. For larger projects, we have "yard signs" that are up during our treatment, and sometimes we leave them up longer. We definitely got back for those, if we leave them up. They don't contain the legal treatment information (we also post those signs), just a general "invasive species management happening, and ISN is doing it" sort of thing to help answer questions about why plants are dying. We'd love to hear if people have thought of better ways!
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