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Vicki Sawicki

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  1. I do not think you should have to pay anything to get information about your CISMA into your local newspapers. We regularly submit press releases about stuff we are doing, and they often publish them. Also, we occasionally provide feature length articles to several of our local papers and they use them. I suppose it depends...the Detroit News might not publish your stuff, but smaller cities, like Cadillac, Ludington, and Big Rapids, are often happy to have free quality content to include for their readers. Also, I make sure to let local reporters know they can call me on slow news days, and they do. Presenting at County Commissioner meetings has proven a great way to meet up with the press, as they always have someone there. Just some ideas from my experience.
  2. NCCISMA is putting on a workshop for a statewide educators conference. I will be presenting what NCCISMA has done in classrooms, but wanted to also include what resources are available through other CISMAs in Michigan. Its short notice for my presentation, taking place 9/27/19, but would be interesting to see what everyone is doing with their local schools anyways. Hoping some of you see this before the 27th though. Here's what NCCISMA has done in classrooms. I will include more details once we have them typed up. Manual control workdays - Garlic Mustard Pulls Invasive species identification walking tours Native vs. Invasives outdoor active game MISIN reporting Contest
  3. We use Jactos. They are very well made, and we have not had any problems with them. Solos do not hold up. The one time we had a problem with a Jacto, we called their customer service and the company was excellent about providing a free replacement. Ours are the blue plastic, which we do not have a problem with seeing what is left in it. We also have a couple of their self oscillating models. Which are great if you are using Escort, since you either need to continuously oscillate or use ammonia as a carrier with that chemical.
  4. Attached are the appendices from NCCISMA's strategic plan, which outlines our policy for choosing steering committee members, and also what their responsibilities are. It is pretty vague. The way it has really worked is the existing steering committee discusses someone we either want to invite or that has asked to join. All the additional members (besides the founding members that included USFS & CDs) have been chosen because they represented a group that we wanted to reach. For instance, MSU Extension crop pest educator to help us reach farmers & College Science Department Head to become known in that community, etc. I think 15 is too many people. We have a limit of 12, but we have ten, which is plenty. We have a participation requirement, and we have replaced a couple that were not able to regularly attend. We also wrote in a means to dismiss members, since we found that one negative force can really make things difficult. I recommend you establish this policy before you have a need for it. Also, I would caution against inviting members that have very narrowly focused objectives in regards to invasive species management. Some partners are only interested in invasive species management as it pertains to their own goals. For instance, some of the CRCs that we partner with are concerned with Japanese knotweed because it is damaging their roads, but are unconcerned with other high priority species on their roadsides because they do not interfere with what they are concerned with. This is fine for a partner, but you really want folks that are all-in on the steering committee. Also, try to pick folks that you think will be willing to roll their sleeves up and help out. My steering committee does a lot of work towards our semi-annual partner meetings - reserving venues; ordering, serving, and paying for or finding sponsors for meals; set-up, greeting, clean-up. They also do a lot of document/outreach-material review. If you do not have that kind of commitment from your steering committee, then you will be doing it all yourself. Just some thoughts. I hope this is helpful Appendices to Strat Plan 19 - NCCISMA.docx
  5. Over the past 2 years we have had a few occurences of poison hemlock, just 1-4 plants each, within our CISMA. This is very new to the area. I have heard that it is prevalent on roadsides south of Michigan, being opportunistic of disturbance. I noticed on Michigan Flora that there are known occurrences both north & south of the six counties of NCCISMA. Has anyone seen this species actively outcompeting natives and impacting habitat (beyond the ROWs)? Since the risk to human health comes from eating it, which is a bad idea for a lot of plants, I do not think the risk to human health qualifies it as invasive. Wondering if I should make control of poison hemlock a priority? Insight and input on this would be appreciated!
  6. North Country CISMA has an opening and is seeking a Seasonal Invasive Species Technician to perform botanical surveys and invasive species control activities over a six county area. The ideal candidate will be an experienced Certified Pesticide Applicator, as they will also act as back-up field crew lead, and assist the field crew in performing invasive species management activities.  The candidate will be conduct invasive species surveys in parks and along trails; terrestrial surveys by foot and aquatic surveys by kayak/canoe. This is a full-time seasonal position, working 40 hours per week for up to 24 weeks. Duty location may be in either Cadillac, Scottville or Paris, MI. Starting pay is $15.00 - $17.00 per hour, commensurate with experience. This position is grant funded, start date is May 6th with funding until the end of October. Deadline to apply is March 18th, 2019. See the attached file for more information about the position and how to apply. Seasonal Tech FINAL 2019_ Job Posting_Mason-Lake employee.pdf
  7. The North Country CISMA is seeking two Seasonal Crew Leads and 4 Seasonal Crew Members for invasive species management and habitat restoration work within the six counties we serve. These are full-time seasonal positions. Benefits include paid federal holidays and vacation/sick leave. Crew Lead pays $13-$15 per hour for up to 24 weeks, preferred start date is April 22nd-May 6th, 2019, deadline to apply is March 18th, 2019 Crew Member pays $11-$13 per hour for up to 16 weeks, preferred start date is May 6th, 2018, deadline to apply is March 18th, 2019 Refer to the attached job postings for position details and application instructions. For more information visit NorthCountryInvasives.org Field Crew Lead FINAL 2019_job posting.pdf Seasonal Field Crew FINAL 2019_job Posting.pdf
  8. North Country CISMA has an opening for someone, with experience and expertise in invasive species identification and control, to act as their Invasive Species Technician. This person will provide technical assistance to property owners, and assist the NCCISMA Program Coordinator with data collection and management. The ideal candidate will be an experienced Certified Pesticide Applicator, as they will also act as back-up field crew lead, and assist the field crew in performing invasive species management activities. This is a full time, 40hr/week, year-round position. Duty location may be in either Cadillac or Scottville, MI. Starting pay is $15.00 - $17.00 per hour, commensurate with experience. This position is grant funded, with funding currently in place through April of 2020. NCCISMA intends for this to be a long-term position, and will be pursuing funding to that effect. Deadline to apply is April 2, 2018. See the attached file for more information about the position and how to apply. IS Tech Job Posting_3-7-18.pdf
  9. The North Country CISMA is seeking a Seasonal Crew Leader and 3 Seasonal Crew Members for invasive species management and habitat restoration work within the six counties we serve. These are full-time seasonal positions. Benefits include paid federal holidays and vacation/sick leave Crew Lead pays $12-$14 per hour for up to 24 weeks, preferred start date is May 7, 2018, deadline to apply is April 2, 2018 Crew Member pays $10-$12 per hour for up to 16 weeks, preferred start date is May 14th, 2018, deadline to apply is April 9, 2018 Refer to the attached job postings for position details and application instructions. For more information visit NorthCountryInvasives.org Field Lead job posting_3-7-18.pdf Seasonal Field Crew Posting_3-7-18.pdf
  10. North Country CISMA is looking for a high energy candidate to fill an Outreach Coordinator position. This person will be responsible for carrying on and expanding NCCISMA's already well established outreach program. Creativity and confidence are key! The right candidate is comfortable speaking to groups of people from a variety of age groups and demographics. Strong writing skills are a must, and experience with graphic design is a plus. This is a full time, 40hr/week, year-round position. Duty location may be in either Cadillac or Scottville, MI. Starting pay is $15.00 - $16.00 per hour. This position is grant funded, with funding currently in place through December of 2019. NCCISMA intends for this to be a long-term position, and will be pursuing funding to that effect. Deadline to apply is February 28th. See the attached file for more information about requirements for the position and how to apply. NCCISMA_Outreach Coordinator job posting.docx NCCISMA_Outreach Coordinator job posting.pdf
  11. Fortunately 100 million wildflower seeds is actually not that many. Also, Hoary Allysum is not in the same genus as the "sweet allysum" they are giving out in Canada. I have never seen sweet allysum reseed itself. While a few escapees have been noted in Michigan, I doubt if we need to worry about it. Also, though I have seen forget-me-nots misbehaving, I do not know if they are truly by definition invasive. Harm economy? human health? environment? They may threaten the native forget-me-nots, particularly through hybridization (just conjecture, I don't know of any studies showing this)? Interestingly, I do not know any botanists that can confidently even key out the native species from the invasives without a microscope. Do any of you have some pointers? It does seem that if we are worried about forget-me-nots, we would be better off to address it with the many seed suppliers in our communities, or somehow convince people that these lovely little blue flowers are bad. They are in the category of plants that you should not let into your garden unless you really want them there - impossible to get rid of. Just sayin.
  12. Can someone give me some good references to the invasive properties of common lilac? What does it do that makes it invasive? What is it hurting? Any known "horror story" locations? References on the subject would be helpful too. Thanks!
  13. Bird Poop! Tough to fight something still being sold & planted A LOT!
  14. Big shout-out to our cohorts in eastern Iowa! The Hawkeye CWMA is fully sharing their invasive species treatment brochures with North Country CISMA. They are allowing us to use their treatment brochures and change them as we need to match our own recommendations (where ours differ from theirs). Also, they are allowing us to remove all reference to their CISMA on the brochures we print, and to "brand" them with our CISMA's logo! What awesome sharers!! http://www.hawkeyecwma.org/ By the way, the North Country CISMA Steering Committee has decided to adopt this same policy with respect to our printed outreach materials. We recently produced a Quick Reference Field Guide to High Priority Invasive Species that any of you are welcome to use and "re-brand" as your own. I have attached this document here - feel free to redo the front cover to promote your CISMA. Note that we are in the process of completing 2 more pages (bittersweet and buckthorn). These will soon be available for free download from our webpage. http://www.northcountryinvasives.org/ Quick Reference ID Guide.pdf
  15. Formed in 2015, our initial focus has been on inventorying the invasive species already in our 5 county area, and educating the public on the likely next invaders that we would like to keep out of the area. In addition, we are committed to removing hurdles that may discourage private property owners from treating invasive species on their own property. One of these initiatives is the establishment of community tool cribs at each of our participating Conservation District offices, with invasive species mechanical and chemical control equipment available for rent to the public. We are also working to obtain count-wide DEQ permits for chemical treatments of invasive species in wet environments. We are further facilitating private landowner's control of invasive species on their property by providing demonstrations of invasive species control techniques to neighborhood/lake associations. For more info visit our website at NorthCountryInvasives.org or e-mail me at vicki.sawicki@macd.org
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