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Increased focus on Tree of Heaven with SLF coming?

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In a recent webinar it was explained that some researchers think that spotted lanternfly will appear in Michigan within 2-3 years. Does anyone else feel that extra focus should be placed on tree of heaven considering that it is the preferred host plant for SLF? Actions such as removal of female trees, increased mapping, using male trees as sentinel trees, etc might help us prepare for what seems to be an inevitable arrival? I feel reaching out to wineries/breweries might provide some great partnerships seeing as this insect threatens our grapes and hops plants. 

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ISN is hoping to work more with TOH for exactly this reason--our updated prioritization is still in the works, but (spoilers!), TOH has moved up to a higher priority for us.  Funding-depending, we're hoping to work with growers of all kinds (especially in an area like ours with lots of fruit trees).  I like the idea of the wineries/breweries too!

The biggest challenge we see is actually killing the tree.  Literature suggests frill-cuts (instead of cut-stump) is the best treatment, and a lot of the trees we know of in our region are close to structures.  Combine that with TOH's already brittle wood, and that could be a yucky situation!  We're hoping to partner with and/or train some arborists on treatments.

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Treatment of TOH is indeed a problem. I have only seen effective control of TOH using a basal bark of the ester formulation of triclopyr in the hottest part of summer. This is super effective; I have literally seen it work in one treatment. The problem is that this control is not an available option in many of the situations where we find TOH. For instance, TOH is common in urban landscaping and we also find it in public parks, areas where it is not safe to leave a large tree in place until it is dead. Also, we have situations in NCCISMA where TOH is growing in fruit orchards. These TOH would obviously be top of the list priorities for control, to protect the fruit crops in preparation for SLF invasion. Unfortunately, triclopyr is not approved for use in crop sites. We are looking into other options to experiment with cut-stumping TOH in 2020.

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We're working to increase mapping of ToH (especially in crop areas by pushing out MAEAP techs to keep an eye out) and are also using SLF as a way to reach many of our fruit growers. Our area has a significant amount of grape growers, who see SLF kind of as a Spotted Wing Drosophila we can get ahead of. We're not doing a big push on public outreach, since 2-3 years is a long time for an average person to hear about something without seeing it. Instead, we're going directly to growers, through local events or working with MSUE. 

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